“Don’t cry, strategize” How Khalida Brohi is fighting honor killing in rural Pakistan

Khalida Brohi was a teenager when she learned that her uncle had murdered her cousin to restore his family’s honor. Her cousin’s crime: falling in love with a boy who she wasn’t betrothed to marry.

Since 2008, Khalida has been working to end honor killings and domestic violence in the indigenous communities of Pakistan. Her work has led to raising awareness abroad and at home and pressuring the Pakistani government to close loopholes in the law that allowed men to get away with the murder and violence against women in the name of honor.

She also works in the villages to change the mindsets of men like her uncle and women like her grandmother. People whose dignity she must respect while helping them loosen the grip honor has had upon their sense of worth.
This conversation with Khalida Brohi, author of I Should Have Honor was recorded in a special episode at The Women’s Building in San Francisco as part of Inflection Point’s collaboration with Women Lit/Bay Area Book Festival.

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How Jeannette Walls Claimed Her Truth - Author, "The Glass Castle"

When she was young Jeannette Walls wanted nothing more than to escape her crazy, chaotic family. She grew up in poverty, in a crumbling home, where her parents couldn’t always put food on the table. They moved from place to place and school to school. After putting her past behind her to become a successful journalist and author, Walls finally revisited her upbringing in her memoir, "The Glass Castle." Her book was recently adapted into a film, and this week on “Inflection Point,” Walls discusses her unusual upbringing and how she rose out of a seemingly impossible situation. 

Jeannette Walls on the set of "The Glass Castle" photo by Jake Giles Netter

Jeannette Walls on the set of "The Glass Castle" photo by Jake Giles Netter

How to Get Through The Worst, Together - Dr. Kelsey Crowe, Co-founder of Help Each Other Out

Most of us don’t know what to say when we are grieving or how to reach out when the people we love go through something awful. Dr. Kelsey Crowe’s own experiences with grief helped her realize that so many people suffer alone because the people around them don’t know what to do or say. So Kelsey actually shifted her career focus to understand what grieving people want, and what they don’t. She surveyed 900 people about their experiences with grief, founded Help Each Other Out to provide empathy bootcamps, and wrote a book about what she learned. The title of her book sums it up: There is No Good Card For This: What To say and Do When Life Is Scary, Awful and Unfair to People You Love. Lauren talks with Kelsey about what she learned and how we can all help each other out.

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Fear & Mourning on the American Right, Arlie Hochschild, author of "Strangers in Their Own Land"

Arlie Hochschild has been called "one of the most imaginative and productive feminist sociologists of the last thirty years." She's written a number of books including The Second Shift, The Time Bind and The Outsourced Self.  She's a professor emerita at UC Berkeley and lately she's been spending her time trying to understand the rise of the American Right–the only way that she could do that was to leave her Berkeley bubble and go to Louisiana to meet the real people of the Tea Party, not the caricatures. She shares her five year journey in her new book "Strangers in Their Own Land. Anger and Mourning on the American Right". Listen on iTunes or NPR One.

ARLIE HOCHSCHILD

ARLIE HOCHSCHILD

Amy Whitaker, author of "Art Thinking"

How do we make space for innovation in our personal and professional lives? Move from a productivity-based metric to one that makes room for other measures of success. Amy Whitaker has written the book "Art Thinking. How to carve out creative space in a world of schedules, budgets and bosses." She tells us how a major shift in her personal life led her from business school to art school--and ultimately to write this book. 

AMY WHITAKER Photo by:  Sheiva Rezvani

AMY WHITAKER
Photo by: Sheiva Rezvani