How To Re-Design How Girls Learn STEM - Suz Somersall, KiraKira

From her childhood as a self-confessed gaming nerd to her career as an engineering-inspired artist (or is it art-inspired engineer?), Suz Somersall has made a life of her own design. She's now the founder of KiraKira, a learning program that makes girls feel confident and excited about creating new products using 3D printing, design-thinking and STEAM concepts. This week on "Inflection Point," Suz shares how, despite a career full of pivots, one's life can ultimately lead in the same direction all along. 

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Decoding The Secret To Confidence at GE

What does Parseltongue have to do with coding? The GE Women's Network put on a day-long STEM event for sixty middle-school girls last November which included design-thinking and coding exercises–with a Harry Potter theme. During this "bring your daughters to work day" the girls learned they could make magic with code. The girls share their #codelikeagirl experience in this piece by producer Megan Jones. Listen here or on NPR One.

Learn more about GE Girls at ge-girls.com.  

Reshma Saujani, founder of Girls Who Code

Only about a quarter of computer professionals are women--and that's actually down from 1990 when it was 36%. Girls Who Code is a non-profit organization whose mission is to change all that by closing the gender gap in computer science. Founded in 2012 by Reshma Saujani, the program is on track to educate more than 40,000 girls in all 50 states this year. Her goal: one million women in computer science by 2020. And we'll need them. In less than 10 years, the United States will have 1.7 million jobs for engineers and computing professionals. Without girls, we will literally not have enough qualified people to fill these jobs. 

RESHMA SAUJANI

RESHMA SAUJANI