What Happens When Sexual Assault Goes Unpunished: Sarah Delia, Host of “She Says”



When radio journalist Sarah Delia heard a story about the sexual assault of one of her listeners, “Linda” (not her real name), she knew it was a story that needed to be told. It’s also a story about how one survivor took matters into her own hands when the police department she turned to for help seemed to be failing to help her. And it’s a story about how our criminal justice system handles sexual assault cases nationwide--and what needs to change to make violence against women the exception rather than the status quo.

Sarah turned Linda’s story into a new investigative podcast series called “She Says”. Listen to our conversation about the courage it takes to tell your story of sexual assault--and keep telling it---until you are heard by someone who can help you get justice. And also--what it takes to be the person who takes on the “second-degree trauma” of listening to and reporting on stories of sexual assault.

To learn more about what to expect from the criminal justice system in cases of sexual assault--and how you can help advocate for better policies, you can check out these resources on the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN).

She Says also has a list of resources on their website.

And if you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault and need to talk about it with someone, call the National Sexual Assault Hotline: 800-656-HOPE.

 Sarah Delia  Photo by Logan Cyrus

Sarah Delia

Photo by Logan Cyrus

How To Fight An Invisible Illness - Jennifer Brea, Creator & Director of “Unrest”

It took Jennifer Brea over a year of seeing doctors and getting second, third and fourth opinions to even land on a diagnosis for a disease that suddenly left her bedridden for days, weeks, months–sometimes unable to turn on a light or even listen to music because of unbearable pain. Was the reluctance to diagnose Jennifer due to a lack of knowledge about a condition that affects millions of people in the US–mostly women? Or were there other, unstated prejudices standing in the way of Jennifer getting treatment?

To show the world that this is a real disease with a truly debilitating impact on her life–not just in her head–and to inspire the medical community to take the lead on finding answers–Jennifer created a film, mostly from her bed, out of the videos she captured of herself, others like her and the few experts there are. Her film is called "Unrest."

 Photo by Sam Heesen

Photo by Sam Heesen